Editorial

Imposing Values on Others

A program designed to give improved sexual health and relationships education, to be taught in secondary schools, does not necessarily need to impose values. It can be just nuts and bolts stuff. But it is very difficult not to impose values, because, first of all, someone has to make the decision as to what is included in the course content. That person has also to decide what is NOT going to be in the course.

The old example of the parts of the flower of the lemon, with stamen, ovary, pollen etc, and the bit about the bee doing its stuff is easy - there are no morality issues involved in the bee being under-age, or unmarried, or of the lemon flower having the right to say no. Indeed, condoms for bees knees would turn the whole purpose of nectar gathering into gluttony alone.

If a political party believes that "young people need to learn how to develop healthy relationships, which includes learning how to confidently say No, and how to confidently protect themselves from unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection if and when they do decide to", they are imposing values on others. The value they are imposing is that young people may, of their own choice, choose to have sex outside of marriage, without any realisation of the consequences of doing so in respect of the morality or immorality of sex outside of marriage.

Depending on your point of view, sex outside of marriage is either moral or immoral. 

There is absolutely no dodging the issue of a value judgement here. It is either one or the other.

If the course deviates in the slightest degree from anything other than nuts and bolts stuff, then it is inherent that VALUES ARE BEING IMPOSED! 

It is no wonder Christians would object to a course that does not include the morality/ immorality of sex outside of marriage. 

For those who accuse Christians of imposing values on others there is only one thing that can be said - if we don't "impose" our values on others, someone else will "impose" theirs!

 

 

Yes - we proudly campaigned for improved sexual health and relationships education to be taught in secondary schools, and yes we believe that the programme run by SHINE SA is an excellent example. The simple fact is that young people need to be learn how to develop healthy relationships, which includes learning how to confidently say No, and how to confidently protect themselves from unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection if and when they do decide to become sexually active.

instead of taking the word of groups who impose their own values on others. 


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